Think Like an Editor blog by Steve Davis and Emilie Davis, Newhouse School, Syracuse University. Editing for print and digital, new media journalism.

May you keep your friends close

By · Wednesday, May 27th, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

At the end of your work day, whether that means 2 p.m., 5 p.m. or 2 a.m., it’s nice to have a circle of people with whom you can spend time and relax.

That can be difficult in a profession such as journalism, where the only other people who are up in the wee hours are the ones walking out of the newsroom with you. Or, where the people you have come to know best are your sources.

That’s why “old and dear friends” are so important.

May you keep your friends close.

It’s easy to wander from your best friend in high school or your best bud in college. Time and distance have a way of doing that to relationships.

But consider all the ways you can keep connected — snail mail, email, phone, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Skype. And more.

There’s no better feeling than hearing from someone you treasure “out of the blue.” And when you do the reaching out, you never know when you might be helping someone “out of the blues” by staying in touch.

May you have a strong work ethic

By · Tuesday, May 26th, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

“Just do it” is a trademark of Nike and a universally understood message.

It represents the company’s mission, which it states is to:

Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world.

*If you have a body, you are an athlete.

If you “just do it,” you will get it done — and then some.

May you have a strong work ethic.

What this doesn’t mean:

Journalists, by nature of the profession, will put in long hours, no question. They will work weekends and holidays, for sure. They will work through a week and weekend (or more) without a day off, at times. Think natural disaster in your own city, for example.

But to have a strong work ethic means even more. It means:

Every day. It should be second nature to dig in and pitch in — every time, not just in emergencies.

At the point when energy is the lowest and challenges the greatest, the person with a strong work ethic will overcome all obstacles. And will lead others to do the same.

May you remember …

By · Monday, May 25th, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

May you remember … on this Memorial Day 2015

 

 

 

Topics: Tips, Trends · Tags: ,

May you keep up with industry news

By · Sunday, May 24th, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

If you are a journalist, young or older, veteran or newbie, you’ll want to read this piece, “How Journalism Schools are Adjusting to the Digital Age.”

May you keep up with industry news.

In this piece in Columbia Journalism Review, author Danny Funt shares some history of what journalism schools have done to adapt, and what they plan to do. This is of special interest to those of us who used to be in the newsroom and now are in the classroom. One reason: We are adapting every time we step in front of a room full of students.

And, yet, one thing remains constant. Edward Wasserman, dean of UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, says it best:

“With all the wonderful toys and technologies that we want to give students, writing mastery remains the gift that keeps on giving.”

So while you are experiencing the newfangled, remember to keep this most basic concept in mind. And, at the same time, keep up with industry news.

May you experience the newfangled

By · Saturday, May 23rd, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

If you search online for “When was the washing machine invented?” you’ll get many hits with neatly packaged explanations, going all the way back to the scrub board and including modern-day machines and the people who invented them.

What do washing machines have to do with journalism?

Our Newhouse School colleague, Dan Pacheco, uses washing machines to explain the “cycle of media disruption.” As he tells students:

The only way to be successful in a media career is to embrace change, run toward it and simultaneously avoid getting stuck in last year’s paradigm

May you experience the newfangled.

Dan has a neat job as the Peter Horvitz Chair in Journalism Innovation. In a piece Dan wrote for CommPRO.biz, he describes his role:

… to look on the horizon and identify trends that might lead the next waves of disruption

He has identified five trends he says will “uproot current media businesses and empower entirely new ones.”

  1. Virtual reality
  2. Augmented reality
  3. Structural photography
  4. Wearables and implantables
  5. Drones and sensors

If you want to keep up with — and run toward — change, Dan’s outlook on these five trends is a good start. It’s all about the newfangled.

May you establish priorities

By · Friday, May 22nd, 2015 · No Comments »

stock-photo-44980974-may-2015-calendarMAY you …

For the month of May, we are devoting this blog to our wishes for journalists present and future: “MAY you … “

Every day, you will find a tip, a tidbit or a top-of-mind piece of advice we hope will help you now and later

This wish applies to your professional and personal lives, which must exist in comity and not get hopelessly tied like a tight knot that won’t come undone.

May you establish priorities.

These priorities will — and should — change with time and with circumstance. At one point, your personal life might be the priority.

And that’s where your professional life enters. When your priority is your work, your career and your future, then beware of getting involved with someone who is a colleague.

For interns? You are a special group of colleague. Some organizations have zero tolerance for fraternization. Don’t count on others to draw and to follow the boundaries. You are the one who must use common sense.

The best way this concept was ever explained to me was back when I was a Dow Jones News Fund intern, about to start at my assigned location. Here is how I remember the advice:

You are temporary. You might be treated like a regular, and that’s good.

But at the end of your internship, you will be gone and others remain. Leave good memories of yourself, not a trail of destruction.

Strict? For sure. Wise? Absolutely. Easy to follow? That’s the reason for priorities.

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