Trust what you publish, what you read

not teaching, still THINKING … Skeptical about anything these days? It’s not enough for stories to be complete and clear. They also must be free of faults and shortcomings. The best way to look for these — whether you are a journalist or a reader — is to apply methodical scrutiny to a story by […]

Much to learn from tale of Te’o

It’s the perfect time to post about Manti Te’o, the Notre Dame football player. You probably think I’m kidding. Aren’t most of us too sick of it to even think about it? We were duped by a once-in-a-lifetime story; let’s just learn our lesson and move on. But it’s not once in a lifetime, really. […]

Strauss-Kahn case vs. skeptical editing

We have written before about skeptical editing, which is — in the words of journalist Reid MacCluggage — to put a story on the witness stand. The strategy is to ask, sentence by sentence, paragraph by paragraph, two important and often revealing questions: Who said it? How do you know it? The purpose is not […]

Be a skeptical editor: Video

A lot of our video posts are inspired by everyday things. Something happens, and it reminds us of parallels in the business, particularly editing. Such was the case with my purchase of new coffee mugs to replace the (no doubt) lead-tainted ones of old. It’s a miracle they haven’t made us sick. When I bought […]

Skeptical editing: more than curiosity

In the advanced editing course that I teach at the Newhouse School, students read a story yesterday that was published in The New York Times on Feb. 7 under the headline, “Sinatra Song Often Strikes Deadly Chord.” The song? “My Way.” Students were instructed to follow the skeptical editing method as they read the story. […]