Watch your words and your tone

not teaching,still THINKING … Editorializing is a word we don’t hear much, perhaps because everyone has a point of view and also has the means to share it. But with news stories, editorializing is not considered a good thing. Here’s why: Editorializing means the content sounds as if it is coming from the writer and […]

These key questions will lead to trust

not teaching,still THINKING … Ask yourself this: As a news consumer, how can I trust information? As a journalist, how can I ensure news consumers trust what I provide? The answer: credit. Credit gives journalists and their work credibility. And three elements in a story — attribution, sources and substantiation — give credit in distinct […]

3 not-so-easy ways to maintain credibility

not teaching,still THINKING … Summer internships are approaching, and journalism interns must take special care with their credibility. Not a journalist? Or an intern? These tips on how to stay above reproach still might apply. Don’t socialize with or enter into relationships with sources. This could mean local government or law enforcement officials, or local […]

4 ways to inspire ourselves and others

not teaching,still THINKING … Inspiration makes our jobs worthwhile. So does feedback. It’s true of journalism, but we think everyone can relate. With that general idea in mind, here are some key questions we can ask ourselves on a regular basis. What purpose is my work serving in my community and for my audience? It’s […]

Credit: Use this checklist to get it right

Three elements in a story — attribution, sources and substantiation — give credit in distinct ways. Credit is essential to give you and your work credibility. Attribution tells readers where information came from; it makes the story transparent. Sources indicate that others — not the reporter — provided information; they make the story credible. Substantiation […]

Inside look at reporters on the outside

In a tweet today, our colleague Simon Perez brought to our attention a story by media reporter Paul Farhi of The Washington Post, “Why Journalists Need to Practice What They Preach.” The piece is straightforward. When they’re on the other side of a microphone or press pad, reporters can be as thin-skinned, controlling and paranoid as […]